Key Stage 3

In Geography we look at physical and human aspects of the world. We try to understand why they are there, how they happened and how they are changing so that we can appreciate what our futures might be like.

We look at a whole range of topics such as settlements and urban issues, natural hazards such as volcanoes, earthquakes and flooding, deserts and tropical rainforests, the countries of Italy, Japan and the developing world.

As well as using a range of traditional methods such as atlases and OS maps we also use a wide range of visual images as we study both photographs and video. By following current events in the news the relevance of Geography to everyday life is learnt.

We have the opportunity to go on field trips, for example studying how our local town centres are changing or further afield to explore areas of coastline.

Key Stage 4

We follow the AQA Geography GCSE exam syllabus which has 3 sections with 3 exam papers at the end of Year 11.

Students will travel the world from the classroom, exploring case studies in the UK, other developed countries, newly emerging economies like India and low-income countries. Topics of study include climate change, poverty, deprivation, global shift in economic power and the challenge of sustainable resource use and natural hazards. Students are also encouraged to understand their role in society, by considering different viewpoints, values and attitudes.

The syllabus will continue to develop skills acquired during KS3 using multiple visual resources maps, photographs, diagrams, DVDs and graphs. This suits our students very well as does the time spent discussing contemporary and relevant world issues in the news.

There is no differentiation between Higher and Foundation papers so students have full access to higher marks. The range of exam techniques includes multiple choice questions, visual analysis, short open questions and some extended writing questions.

There will be several field trips, including an urban investigation in London, a tourism enquiry in Brighton and possibly a residential trip to gain first- hand experience of tectonic activity.